Views and debates on climate change policy
Home | Panelists | Staff Blog | RSS

Post Carbon

More climate huddling

By Juliet Eilperin

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid met Wednesday afternoon with several key committee chairs and White House staff to discuss how to proceed with climate legislation--and the plan is there's still no definite plan, beyond more closed-door negotiations.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry (D-Mass.) gave an overview of the draft climate and energy bill he's been sketching out along with Sens. Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) and Joseph I. Lieberman, according to sources familiar with the meeting, and said he could share more when a final draft text is done in early to mid-April. Obama climate czar Carol Browner and White House congressional liaison Phil Schiliro, who attended the session, said they would be happy to work with all the relevant chairs, including those from the Agriculture; Commerce, Science and Transportation; Energy and Natural Resources; Environment and Public Works; and Finance committees.

Reid told the assembled senators that they should provide the climate troika with feedback within a few weeks of receiving the draft text, sources said, and in the words of one Senate aide who asked not to be identified, "Several senators expressed hope that more Republican senators would start to publicly support and engage in the process soon."

No doubt.

In the meantime, Kerry, Graham and Liebermen met with freshmen Democrats Wednesday evening about their proposal. And on Thursday afternoon they've got a meeting lined up with officials from several industries affected by the bill.

And as if Browner didn't have enough heavy lifting in front of her, Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) sent a letter to White House counsel Robert Bauer questioning whether the climate czar violated the Presidential Records Act by striking a "secret deal" with auto manufacturers on regulations for greenhouse gas emissions.

Browner declined to comment on the letter, which suggested she may possibly be guilty of "deliberately violating the law" and "pay-for-play strong arm tactics."

By

Juliet Eilperin

 |  March 24, 2010; 6:48 PM ET Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
Previous: Senate climate huddle | Next: Greenpeace spoofs Bob McDonnell

Comments

Please report offensive comments below.



Quote:

"Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid met Wednesday afternoon with several key committee chairs and White House staff to discuss how to proceed with climate legislation--and the plan is there's still no definite plan, beyond more closed-door negotiations."

Those closed-door negotiations will focus on where the players can collect the most money and support in the next two election cycles. They already know that "greenhouse gas emissions" is a dying source of money, but they hope to milk it for one more election cycle before it totally disappears as the house of cards behind the church of global warming collapses.

Secret deals are one way to avoid disrupting the entire automobile manufacturing industry for non-sense issues about carbon dioxide. Reducing dependency on foreign oil is actually simple; just increase the price.

The European countries figured this out decades ago and addressed the problem by taxing automobile fuels. Leadership here would have to propose new fuel taxes to do that here, and they lack some critical requirements that would be needed to increase those taxes:

- a spine
- an interest in the well being of the country rather than their next election victory

Posted by: AGWsceptic99 | March 26, 2010 1:33 AM
Report Offensive Comment

Post a Comment


 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2010 The Washington Post Company