On Leadership
Video | PostLeadership | FedCoach | | Books | About |
Exploring Leadership in the News with Steven Pearlstein and Raju Narisetti

PostLeadership

Archive: January 9, 2011 - January 15, 2011

Finally, merit pay for auto workers?

A pay structure that only rewards seniority or job description does not do much to encourage people to work better, smarter and more efficiently on a day-to-day basis. Rather, it rewards people solely for sticking around. And as GM and Chrysler try to get out from under the government's investments, they will need their people--all of their people--to do a lot more than that.

By Jena McGregor | January 14, 2011; 10:07 AM ET | Comments (24)

Obama and Palin: Two responses at a time of crisis

Wednesday's coda to the initial aftermath of Saturday's shooting in Tucson offered up two distinct portraits of two very different leaders.

By Jena McGregor | January 13, 2011; 11:01 AM ET | Comments (237)

Haiti's Iron Market: A symbolic rebirth

Symbolism plays a huge role in leadership, and O'Brien's investment in the Iron Market's reopening within a year of the tragedy is an example of its power. Symbolic gestures motivate people in any situation, but especially in a place where the scale of human misery is as tremendous as it is in Port-au-Prince. And in Haiti, where so little hope is left, it may be one of the only remaining things that works.

By Jena McGregor | January 12, 2011; 9:32 AM ET | Comments (2)

Sheriff Dupnik, first on rhetoric now on gun control: Speaking his mind or overstepping his bounds?

All of that raises an interesting leadership question. By editorializing on the Tucson tragedy, is Dupnik boldly pushing the national conversation forward and speaking out about what he believes in, as good leaders should? Or is he overstepping his bounds, inserting his own personal ideals at a time when he should be objective?

By Jena McGregor | January 11, 2011; 9:31 AM ET | Comments (98)

Arizona shootings: Must it take tragedy to wake up Washington?

But the fact that six people had to die before officials got serious about toning down the vitriol makes a mockery of this thing we call leadership. Real leaders would have stepped forward before this tragedy occurred, making it a priority to calm the discourse before things got out of hand. The ultimate irony, of course, is that Gabrielle Giffords was just that kind of leader.

By Jena McGregor | January 10, 2011; 10:05 AM ET | Comments (29)

 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company