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Archive: February 13, 2011 - February 19, 2011

Palin's milk joke goes sour

Who knows whether or not Palin will run for the nation's highest office. But if she does, comments like this one do little to make her sound presidential. For one, even if it was a joke, Palin was making light of something that has to do with the future of this country--the health and well-being of its children. And even if Palin spent most of the talk discussing deficits, health-care reform and foreign affairs, it's unnecessary side comments like these that will--whether she likes it or not--lead the news.

By Jena McGregor | February 18, 2011; 9:22 AM ET | Comments (1653)

Think you can balance the budget?

By putting constituents in her shoes, Purdue is helping them to see that on the heels of a massive recession that has pushed state governments to the breaking point, there are no easy choices. Helping people realize how difficult it is to decide whether to cut spending in education, public safety or social services could help elicit a more cooperative and civil discussion about what to do.

By Jena McGregor | February 17, 2011; 10:23 AM ET | Comments (30)

Boehner's 'so be it' leadership

The president may not be winning any leadership medals for his budget dealings, but the opposition's leader isn't either.

By Jena McGregor | February 16, 2011; 1:08 PM ET | Comments (138)

Little excuse for the thin U.S. leadership bench in Afghanistan

No student of any kind of history--military, political or otherwise--would have expected the conflict in Afghanistan to be over quickly, which means a leadership pipeline should have been an obvious need and top priority.

By Jena McGregor | February 15, 2011; 9:45 AM ET | Comments (11)

Why form a debt commission? Obama's budget skirts asked-for advice

One has to wonder why the president would establish a panel of experts and seek their recommendations if their biggest proposals are to be ignored. At the very least, the president could offer a more complete explanation about why some of the commission's major proposals were not endorsed. Even better would have been to offer alternative ways to address some of the big spending areas--Social Security and Medicare, for instance--with equally big results.

By Jena McGregor | February 14, 2011; 10:13 AM ET | Comments (16)

 
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