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Archive: Women in leadership

Palin's milk joke goes sour

Who knows whether or not Palin will run for the nation's highest office. But if she does, comments like this one do little to make her sound presidential. For one, even if it was a joke, Palin was making light of something that has to do with the future of this country--the health and well-being of its children. And even if Palin spent most of the talk discussing deficits, health-care reform and foreign affairs, it's unnecessary side comments like these that will--whether she likes it or not--lead the news.

By Jena McGregor | February 18, 2011; 09:22 AM ET | Comments (1653)

Think you can balance the budget?

By putting constituents in her shoes, Purdue is helping them to see that on the heels of a massive recession that has pushed state governments to the breaking point, there are no easy choices. Helping people realize how difficult it is to decide whether to cut spending in education, public safety or social services could help elicit a more cooperative and civil discussion about what to do.

By Jena McGregor | February 17, 2011; 10:23 AM ET | Comments (30)

Quotas for a 'prettier' corporate board?

Should companies be forced to put women in leadership roles? It may seem like regulatory anathema to U.S. businesses, but it's not unheard of in Europe.

By Jena McGregor | February 8, 2011; 08:58 AM ET | Comments (24)

Can Arianna Huffington hold onto that founder's drive?

What may be the more interesting question is how this deal will play out for Huffington. She'll end up far richer, of course. But will she be able to retain the sense of urgency and entrepreneurial zeal that got her site where it is now?

By Jena McGregor | February 7, 2011; 01:32 PM ET | Comments (24)

Obama and Palin: Two responses at a time of crisis

Wednesday's coda to the initial aftermath of Saturday's shooting in Tucson offered up two distinct portraits of two very different leaders.

By Jena McGregor | January 13, 2011; 11:01 AM ET | Comments (237)

UConn's Auriemma: Breaking Wooden's streak

Auriemma has been called arrogant--something few would ever ascribe to Wooden, college basketball's patron saint. He may not be long on feel-good inspirational mottoes, but Auriemma's record speaks for itself.

By Jena McGregor | December 22, 2010; 11:21 AM ET | Comments (19)

The remaking of Murkowski?

Murkowski will be a leader to watch, keeping the possibility alive that she could decide to vote her own way, "pulling a Joe Lieberman" on occasion. She may not owe much to her party. But she may feel she owes at least something to the independents and even Democrats who swung her way.

By Jena McGregor | November 18, 2010; 12:44 PM ET | Comments (27)

Hearst's Cathleen Black, and the trend of 'outsiders' as schools chancellors

The pattern of mayors appointing chancellors outside the usual realm of longtime deputy public school system administrators is nothing new. Michelle Rhee's appointment in 2007 to lead D.C.'s schools surprised Washington, as the education nonprofit leader had never run a school--much less an organization anywhere near the size of the city's public school system.

By Jena McGregor | November 11, 2010; 11:24 AM ET | Comments (4)

Time for Pelosi to call it quits as Democratic figurehead?

For better or for worse, selecting leaders is a very symbolic act. Someone may be an effective fundraiser, or a brilliant manager, or a seasoned negotiator; but if they are the wrong face for the wrong time, they have a much harder time being any of those things. With President Obama talking compromise and greater back-and-forth (he hopes) with the newly empowered Republican party, having Nancy Pelosi as the figurehead of the Democratic Congress sends the message that things are unlikely to change.

By Jena McGregor | November 8, 2010; 10:06 AM ET | Comments (44)

Is Sarah Palin good for women in government?

the Democrats get the bloodbath that's expected, women could lose seats in national office for the first time in 30 years, reports the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. Which leads to the question: Is Sarah Palin good for women in government?

By Jena McGregor | October 29, 2010; 12:01 AM ET | Comments (148)

Goldman's new outsider

The most interesting move may be Goldman's hiring of Bess Joffe to be its new vice president of investor relations. Joffe, an attorney who worked for Hermes Equity Ownership Services until she was hired by Goldman recently, has been an advocate for better boards and improved pay and leadership practices, and her hiring was cheered by governance gurus like Charles Elson...

By Jena McGregor | October 18, 2010; 02:34 PM ET | Comments (2)

Kaya Henderson: The new and improved Rhee?

If ever there was an example that shows why management style should get more weight, it's Michelle Rhee. Consider the transfer of power from Rhee to Kaya Henderson, who will be interim schools chancellor but is also considered a potential permanent replacement. Not only did Henderson, like Rhee, get her start with Teach for America and work with Rhee for her New Teacher Project organization, she was an implementer of Rhee's strategies for reform in D.C. She calls Rhee her "friend, partner, mentor."

By Jena McGregor | October 15, 2010; 09:47 AM ET | Comments (8)

Where Rhee went wrong

Now that the dust has settled on the news of her departure, Rhee's tenure has plenty to teach leaders about managing change. While the views on Rhee's record are decidedly mixed, even supporters are likely to agree she violated one of the fundamental rules of change management: Rhee was never really able to enlist support from the people--namely teachers and parents--who would ultimately implement the changes she hoped to instill.

By Jena McGregor | October 13, 2010; 02:19 PM ET | Comments (84)

Clinton-Biden switcheroo? Not a bad idea

Why not? Rotating executives between top jobs happens all the time in business, and is seen as good management and corporate governance. It's a natural way for leaders to challenge themselves, develop their skills and stretch different management muscles for a few years.

By Jena McGregor | October 6, 2010; 09:49 AM ET | Comments (31)

Why the pay gap persists

The incredible persistence of the wage gap is a complex issue, one that involves all of the above issues in some way. But I'd argue that until leaders truly adopt family-friendly policies and workplaces--much progress has been made, but more is needed--and until more is done to support working mothers with greater childcare resources, the wage gap isn't likely to budge much more.

By Jena McGregor | September 28, 2010; 12:11 PM ET | Comments (49)

Warren's appointment: The pitfalls of compromise

And so, Obama landed on a compromise--something leaders have to do every day. Except that in Obama's world (where voter dissatisfaction, a radically polarized political spectrum and a news media hungry to turn everything into a controversy), compromises don't have the usual effect.

By Jena McGregor | September 16, 2010; 11:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

Women in leadership: Not tough enough?

As women eventually reach pinnacles of power in greater numbers--the C-suite, the director's chair, the president's office--they're sure to reshape the cultural notions of power, too.

By Jena McGregor | August 5, 2010; 12:55 PM ET | Comments (10)

 
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