Willie Jolley
Motivational speaker and Authr

Willie Jolley

Award Winning Speaker and Singer, Best Selling Author and host of "The Willie Jolley Motivational Minute" daily on WUSA-Channel 9 and WHUR-FM and The Willie Jolley Show, weekends on XM Radio, Channel 169.

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Four keys to success

Q: Is it wise when athletes pursue success at the expense of their educations? Simon Cho dropped out of high school to train as a short-track speed skater, and his father sold his business to pay the bills. The teenager ended up surprising everyone -- including himself -- by making the U.S. Olympic team. Is tunnel vision a good thing in pursuit of such a demanding goal? Are extreme sacrifices necessary, or foolish?

When I was doing the research for my book, "A Setback Is A Setup For A Comeback," I interviewed hundreds of people who had created massive success, and all gave the same answers ...that you must have a clear vision, make tough decisions, take persistent and consistent action, and have great desire.

Young Mr Cho and his parents exhibit the same keys to success.

I would never recommend anyone quit school, but there is a story of another young man who left school (college) early and used the same four keys (vision, decision, action and desire) to build a new company ... called Microsoft. His name is Bill Gates.

I would recommend we keep our eyes and ears open for young Mr Cho, because even if he doesn't succeed in the Olympics, he has the stuff that greatness is made of!

By Willie Jolley  |  February 16, 2010; 1:21 PM ET  | Category:  Determination Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
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Mr. Gats quit Harvard to succeed in business unlike Mr. Cho who quite high school. High school gives one a basic education. If Mr. Cho is very successful and even if he becomes financially successful, will he know anything about finances because he lacks a basic high school education.

Posted by: Listening2 | February 16, 2010 6:41 PM
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