The League

THE QUESTION

How Can the Pro Bowl Be Saved?

The Pro Bowl has left Hawaii for Miami during the Super Bowl bye week before the big game. The question remains though, does anyone care?

Posted by Emil Steiner on February 6, 2009 8:27 AM
FEATURED COMMENTS

octopi213: While it has been pointed out that the difference between the football season and the seasons of other sports prevents football from having ...

ozpunk: It is basically a post season vacation for players to go to Hawaii play a quick scrimmage and then live it up on the island with free airfar...

PatD1: The risk of injury has always been the bugaboo for the NFL Pro Bowl. Granted, all sports have their share of injuries but the rate of inci...

Make a Comment  |  All Comments (4)

ALL COMMENTS (4)
alex35332 Author Profile Page :

The only way I can ever see the Pro-bowl being relevant to fans is if they give the teams that participate in the wining conference a extra late draft pick or something.

I also think that players should get some kind of special marks on their helmets for every pro-bowl, MVP award, conference championship and world championship. Kinda like the pride stickers in college but accumulated over the career

octopi213 Author Profile Page :

While it has been pointed out that the difference between the football season and the seasons of other sports prevents football from having a mid-season all star game, there is another key difference: The nature of the sport itself.
Football is the most physical and brutal game of the 4 major sports. You can't play football at half speed or 75%. You can't tell guys, "Don't hit so hard," or "Be gentle with your tackles."
It is well known that the NBA All Star game has a Gentlemen's agreement to not give more than a show of defense or physical play (no taking charges, not fighting hard for rebounds, etc).
The MLB All-Star game is much like little leauge, where guys bat no more than 3 times and pitchers pitch a max of 2 innings. Plus it's not a "physical" game in the sense of having a lot of collisions and guys getting knocked around.
Even the NHL All Star game has that same gentlmen's agreement of no hitting, hooking, etc. In fact, I heard this year's game had the first penalty in the last 10 or so All-Star Games.
So in these 3 other sports, the risk of injury is drastically less in their All Star games compared to a regular season or playoff game. But in football, even in the Pro Bowl, that risk of injury is still very high. And for a guy to get a season or career threatening injury in an all star game not only would be terrible and needless; but it also makes many players beg out of the game.
So, to recap: The Pro Bowl comes after the biggest game of the year, does not matter, many of the best players beg out of it, and the risk of a serious injury remains very high. It should be done away with. Maybe having it the week before the Super Bowl would work (obviously the players from the SB teams wouldn't play), but really they should just name the teams and not actually play the game and subject the players to such risks when there is absolutely zero reward for anybody; fans, players, owner

ozpunk Author Profile Page :

It is basically a post season vacation for players to go to Hawaii play a quick scrimmage and then live it up on the island with free airfare and most expenses paid (I would assume). Moving it to a different place might save the NFL money but it will diminish interest in players wanting to participate. Would they really want to go to Indianapolis, or Detroit, or somewhere like that in the chill of February to play a meaningless football game? They should keep it in Hawaii, I'm sure it's a nice boost to their economy as well.

PatD1 Author Profile Page :

The risk of injury has always been the bugaboo for the NFL Pro Bowl. Granted, all sports have their share of injuries but the rate of incidence and their degree of severity put the NFL in a league of their own. As it exits to day, the NFL is a meatgrinder and we pay people to jump into it. Happy viewing.

 
 
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