The League

THE QUESTION

Why Does Madden Matter?

With the retirement of longtime broadcaster, coach and video game icon John Madden we look back on how he changed the game of football.

Posted by Emil Steiner on April 16, 2009 1:26 PM
FEATURED COMMENTS

american1: God thought he would never retire, as someone that loves pro football I have listened to Madden for far too many years. Guess it is impossib...

Utahreb: As a 72 year old female, I have to say that I rooted for the Raiders when Madden was coaching and then tuned in when he was a broadcaster. ...

wprioleau: Madden did two things I appreciate. First, and I say this with the highest regard, he made dumb jock talk sound good. He did ramble at times...

Make a Comment  |  All Comments (11)

ALL COMMENTS (11)
Jordan48 Author Profile Page :

On many occasions, I have settled into my easy chair with a cold drink and some pop corn, or other snakables, to watch my favorite team kick some serious booty.

Much to my dismay, however, I have been compelled to listen to the endless ramblings of Joe Madden, whom I thought had become so enamoured by the sound of his own voice echoing through the air ways and bye ways of television.

I was often puzzled as to why he was so popular with the sports networks? For his insights to the game seemed somewhat less than revealing, but more repeticious in nature. Oft times, he spoke when he should have been quiet. For it is better to be thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt.

Sorry Joe, but I will not miss you, nor will I weep when you are gone from the limelight. I wish you the very best in your second retirement, or is this your third?

salescoach Author Profile Page :

Joe? Is Jordan48 talking about the same guy? That said, he's right about Madden becoming obvious and tedious. Early on, he deserved all the credit heaped on him for his impact on televised football. That, however, was a long time ago. In recent years (decade?) many would argue that he had grown tiresome. It's as if he fell in love with his catchphrases and used them as crutches. To his everlasting credit, though, he always managed to avoid using coachspeak and italetechnical terminology to describe the game. Unfortunately, much like Dickie V, another passionate fan-turned-broadcaster who lost sight of the fact that it wasn't really about him and became more than one could bear, we ended up with too much John Madden, too little original insight. Al Michaels is a rock for PBP, and Troy Aikman carried Madden when they worked together.

WashingtonDame Author Profile Page :

John Madden matters because he made people like me, who aren't die-hard football fans or even die-hard sports fans, watch the games he broadcast. He was always entertaining and funny, and reminded me of my favorite uncle. If he was calling a game, I tuned it, even if I didn't really care which team won.

wapo9 Author Profile Page :

John Madden matters because without him, three minutes of an NFL broadcast might go by without someone telling us how great Brett Favre is.

Mill_in_Mn Author Profile Page :

Mr. Madden seems authentic and enthusiastic - his love of the game is obvious.

delOH Author Profile Page :

Madden was the best in the business. Period, end of story. His football knowledge, the fact that he was a quality NFL coach who left the field at a young age, made his analysis second to none. His biggest asset in broadcasting is his coaching background. I had always hoped Cowher would be his replacement, that way I wouldn't have my heart ripped out watching Cowher coach a team other than the Steelers.

bill3 Author Profile Page :

I'm glad he's gone. Having to listen to his inane ramblings was torture enough if my team was winning. When they were losing I was far more apt to turn the game off to escape his yabbering on about turduckin and endless praise of Brett Favre or the Cowboys. Don't get me wrong, I like Favre (I liked him alot more a year ago), but enough is enough.

Mark20005 Author Profile Page :

I'm going to miss Madden. He loved football the way I love it. All out and with no apologies. Celebrating the hits, the mud, muck and gritty plays that are the great history of the sport. Not the pretty-boy ballet dancers of today's NFL.

american1 Author Profile Page :

God thought he would never retire, as someone that loves pro football I have listened to Madden for far too many years. Guess it is impossible to speak millions of words without just repeating the same crap over and over again. Madden found the most under rated player in football every week, guess the rating must have changed weekly! I hope this leads to less crap and more silents so fans can watch football and not have to put up with their asinine comments!

Utahreb Author Profile Page :

As a 72 year old female, I have to say that I rooted for the Raiders when Madden was coaching and then tuned in when he was a broadcaster. He explained the game to many of us who, even though we went through years of our kids playing football, were not well-versed in the game. His enthusiasm never waned and I appreciated him for many, many years - both as a coach and in the booth.

wprioleau Author Profile Page :

Madden did two things I appreciate. First, and I say this with the highest regard, he made dumb jock talk sound good. He did ramble at times, but every now and then, he explained something that us non-football players would likely never have understood. Second, he did more to hightlight the contribution of the glitterless positions like OT than any other talkhead before him. True, he would never inspire Toastmaster medal conversations, but the man left his mark (even if it did reak of BudLite). Take care John...

 
 
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