The League

THE QUESTION

Should NFL Teams Reduce Ticket Prices?

With American budgets stretched thinner than ever, is it time for pro-football franchises to lower prices or do nothing and risk half-empty stadiums?

Posted by Emil Steiner on May 1, 2009 10:10 AM
FEATURED COMMENTS

Booyah5000: None of these said so directly, but I was under the impression that almost every NFL game is a sell out. Unless a team is regularly not sel...

JPRS: Agree with Boyah5000 -- Pro Sports are in the business of turning a profit; they aren't based on a model of a public charity. As a business...

dj1123: Ok, so the NFL continues to raise prices which means fewer people go to the games (overall) which means people are going to watch the games ...

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ALL COMMENTS (4)
ozpunk Author Profile Page :

I just wish that DirecTV wouldn't charge so much for the Sunday Ticket subscription...

Booyah5000 Author Profile Page :

None of these said so directly, but I was under the impression that almost every NFL game is a sell out. Unless a team is regularly not selling out its home games, then the answer is obviously that the tickets aren't overpriced. Supply and demand.

If price is an issue for fans, I expect that would manifest itself in a drop in concession sales, which everybody agrees are expensive and easily skipped.

Also, I have no idea what baseball games Schaffer is going to, but I've never heard anybody try to argue that a NFL game is cheaper to go see than a MLB game.

JPRS Author Profile Page :

Agree with Boyah5000 -- Pro Sports are in the business of turning a profit; they aren't based on a model of a public charity.

As a business it might make sense to cut prices in order to attract people to the stadium. It might make sense to make targeted price cuts if people are trading down just to keep their seats; if one group is now priced out of the market; or if the thought is that the team can make its margins off of concessions and hugely profitable (and outlandish) parking fees at a place like Fed-Ex.

Regardless of the reason, teams are going to do whatever they do based on a business calculation.

If seats are empty and unsold, price cuts are one way to address the problem -- and I wouldn't be surprised to see some kind of game-day deals.

If stadiums are packed to capacity, I wouldn't expect to see any kinds of discounts.

dj1123 Author Profile Page :

Ok, so the NFL continues to raise prices which means fewer people go to the games (overall) which means people are going to watch the games on TV. Children of some of those people will get caught up in doing other things that are out there (video games, computers, etc.) and the fan bases aren't growing.

The Boston Bruins of the NHL are a perfect example. They, for years, sold out with season tickets (and did not have championship teams), yet when they moved into a new arena, they had trouble selling tickets because they missed an entire generation of hockey fans in New England.

The same thing is going to happen in the NFL. I won't go to a Skins game, or any other game because of the price and I can watch a game on a 13 inch TV to get a "closer" view of the field than the seats that I could afford. Plus, if I want to eat, it won't cost me another $50, I park in my driveway saving $25 and I get to take care of other things that might come up. Plus, I get to spend it with my wife. Oh yeah, and I don't have to worry about an obnoxious drunk (who got into the stadium drunk) spilling his $7 beer all over me in cold weather and sending me home with a cold.

I'd rather sit at home, on my warm couch, watching the game.

To answer the question posted though, only those teams who are playing to empty stadiums should consider lowering prices. If they're selling out, who cares.

Besides, the owners and players aren't going to suffer by lowering prices, they'll get more people coming in and if prices were more reasonable, more people would buy stuff.

 
 
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