The League

THE QUESTION

The NFL's Shrinking Middle Class

Why is there a wider gulf between the good teams in the NFL and the bad teams this season?

Posted by Emil Steiner on October 9, 2009 7:22 AM
FEATURED COMMENTS

pyrrhicane: Is this really a bad trend? I remember the 70's and early 80's, when football dynasties existed, such as the Dallas Cowboys. These teams w...

pike2: In the year when Parity is total, all teams will finish 8-8. The two SB teams will be chosen based on the 345th tie breaker: which teams hav...

Vic1: NFL front office officials recently visited Ashburn to take Dan Snidely to task for overpaying washed up, over the hill free agents -- and o...

Make a Comment  |  All Comments (7)

ALL COMMENTS (7)
tomtheksbcglobalnet Author Profile Page :

professional football is a complete illusion and it is about time for people in the u.s. to wake up to this fact. dull boring play, mostly air out the pigskin and hope some dork catches the ball. then the defense tries to tare the receivers head off. fred.

Ombudsman1 Author Profile Page :

NFL Football was better when there were a handful of good teams.

Instead, we're asked to pretend on Sunday night that an Oakland vs. Cincinnati game has sort of meaning.

largewu Author Profile Page :

Look no further than recent drafts for why some teams are at the bottom of the barrel every year.

Compare these struggling teams 1st round picks over the last 3 years:
Cleveland: Kamerion Wimbley, Joe Thomas, Brady Quinn, Alex Mack
Oakland: Michael Huff, JaMarcus Russell, Darren McFadden, Darrius Heyward-Bey
Kansas City: Tamba Hali, Dwayne Bowe, Branden Albert, Tyson Jackson

to, say, the Vikings:
Chad Greenway, Adrian Peterson, (traded 2008 pick for Jared Allen), Percy Harvin

Some teams are just better at evaluating talent, drafting effectively, and augmenting their team with good free agent pickups. Front office talent is perhaps more important than on-field talent.

JPRS Author Profile Page :

I don't buy the premise. Last year you had a Detroit team that didn't win a single game; two teams only notched two wins (the Rams by virtue of playing the Lions twice); and another 3 that only notched four wins.

In the case of a team like the Rams, KC, the Raiders, or the Browns, I don't think they're any worse than they were last year. On the other hand there are teams like the Bengals and the 49ers that appear to be moving out of the league cellar.

Then there are the teams who posted good records thanks to weak schedules like the Titans last year (or the Browns the year before), who get exposed against a tougher schedule the next year.

There are always bad teams. It's not clear to me that this year is a special case. It's only 4 weeks into the season.

As far as "why are some teams perennially bad"? You have to look at the front office of teams.

pyrrhicane Author Profile Page :

Is this really a bad trend?

I remember the 70's and early 80's, when football dynasties existed, such as the Dallas Cowboys. These teams were good year after year and developed a large following as a result. It was an accomplishment when you defeated one of the big dynasties.

Now, it is not unusual for a team to make it to the Superbowl one year, and wallow new last place the next. It's almost like a crap shoot now. That makes it tough to care enough to root for any particular team, unless you are lucky enough to leave near one of them.

pike2 Author Profile Page :

In the year when Parity is total, all teams will finish 8-8. The two SB teams will be chosen based on the 345th tie breaker: which teams have the biggest laundry hampers.

Vic1 Author Profile Page :

NFL front office officials recently visited Ashburn to take Dan Snidely to task for overpaying washed up, over the hill free agents -- and overly compensating the rest of the team for doing bvery little -- and needlessly driving up the player base salaries for the rest of the league.

"Look you've got Fat Albert, Clinton Whoretis, Jason Clueless, Mike Sellout and all of these other steaming sacks of $hi+ -- all of whom are being overpaid for doing absolutely nothing," said one official. "You must understand that we're striving for parity," said one official.

"But so are we," responded Snidely with feigned sincerity.

After much ensuring confusion, it was finally established that Snidley misunderstood what the league expected of him. For some strange reason, he thought they were demanding league PARODY.

 
 
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