The League

Zach Leibowitz
Sideline Reporter

Zach Leibowitz

A former sideline reporter for ESPN

Sam I Am

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Tim Tebow might very well go all Archie Griffin on us and win his second straight Heisman Trophy. He may even come back for his senior season and go for a three-peat. Regardless, if any or all of this actually happens, Tebow won't be able to achieve the same success at the next level. He's a bigger, badder and better Eric Crouch-style guy. Even so, his style is a versatile one, which isn't necessarily a good thing in the NFL. When NFL teams pick their QB's in the NFL draft, they are looking for the next Peyton Manning and Donovan McNabb. They are looking for franchise changers, preferably immediate franchise changers like Matt Ryan in Atlanta and Joe Flacco in Baltimore. They are also looking for a golden arm.

Sam Bradford is that guy among the Heisman hopefuls. He will further prove it against Tebow in the National Championship. Bradford's quick thinking, sharply accurate style of passing could work very effectively in the right NFL offense. His career completion percentage is almost 70%. Most importantly, the Oklahoma QB has size -- a manly 6-4, 220 pounds. Yet, he's really a baby in just his sophomore season. Think he's a popular guy on campus with the ladies?

Bradford may or may not defeat Tebow and Colt McCoy for the Heisman. Bradford may or may not defeat Tebow for the BCS Championship. And Bradford may or may not even leave Oklahoma for the NFL at this point.

But when he does, he will have an opportunity to make a name for himself at the next level -- and at the rate he's playing, you can expect that much 'Sooner' than later.

By Zach Leibowitz  |  December 12, 2008; 12:20 PM ET  | Category:  College Football , NFL , Quarterbacks Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
Previous: What About Stafford? | Next: McCoy and Bradford Do

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