The League

Jason Brewer
Eagles Blogger

Jason Brewer

An economics student at Fordham University who runs Bleeding Green Nation

He deserves it

CLICK TO REACT Facebook

Given who decides the award, I'd say he does deserve it. The award is given to players who "exemplify commitment to the principles of sportsmanship and courage" but most importantly, it's voted on by the players themselves. They interpret the criteria for the award and they choose who gets it. What they see as courageous could be very different than what we do. They clearly see what Vick has done in his return to the NFL as courageous... maybe we as fans and media disagree, but we don't have a vote here. The players have the vote and therefore they set the criteria. For that reason, Vick deserves it.

That said, I think this points to a larger thing that fans often miss about NFL players. Does anyone remember even one NFL player who had something bad to say about Michael Vick when he came back? Are there even any who didn't seem to go out of their way to welcome him? We even heard Osi Umenyoria say how "proud" he was of the Eagles for bringing Vick back. That's a Giant saying he was proud of the Eagles! On a weekly basis here in Philly we hear Vick's teammates praise him. After every game watch how the opposing team greets him on the field, hugs him, talks to him... These players aren't just in their own union, they're in a fraternity. They protect one another. There isn't a whole lot of doubt in my mind that giving Vick this award was, in some way, the players' way of showing us that. They take care of their own.

Fans may not like the guy, the media sure doesn't, but players do.

By Jason Brewer  |  December 25, 2009; 9:36 AM ET  | Category:  Michael Vick , Philadelphia Eagles Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
Previous: PETA: Eagles fumbled | Next: Vick's the winner

Comments

Please email us to report offensive comments.



Michael Vick is nothing more or less than a statement about the culture of blacks in this country. there is a real possibility that he didn't even realize that he was breaking the law with his avocation of dogfighting. The black culture as indicated by their music , antipathy towards law enforcement , dress , and public attitude is one of flaunting antisocial behaviour. It is impossible to ignore these traits if you live in an area that has a substantial population of blacks.They have been given special dispensation as victims , therefore they feel like they can ignore the rules of civility that the rest of the population is expected to follow.
Until we reach the point of saying "enough' and demand that blacks be held to the same standards of polite society that everyone else is expected to follow , it will only get worse.
Don't blame Vick , blame the culture that produced him!

Posted by: algibbs | December 25, 2009 11:11 AM

Jason, it's racially bias for you or anyone to say the dogfighting is part of the Black culture in America, Black just don't know any better.White people fight dogs too. It may be part of the hip hop culture, in which a lot of young Black people embrace, however a large number of ", BLACK PEOPLE, LIKE MYSELF", take no part in this kind of life style. Everybody that is Black is not into hip hop, and most Black people are law abiding. We are a lawless race of people as you're trying to suggest.Your comment is as ignorant a comment that I've ever heard. It's just as ignorant as dogfighting is, and you need to apologize. Don't just blame the culture, blame the White record labels that perpetuate this filth.

Posted by: keithponder21 | December 25, 2009 11:24 AM

Jason, it's racially bias for you or anyone to say the dogfighting is part of the Black culture in America,we just don't know any better.White people fight dogs too. It may be part of the hip hop culture, in which a lot of young Black people embrace, however a large number of ", BLACK PEOPLE, LIKE MYSELF", take no part in this kind of lifestyle. Everybody Black is not into hip hop, and everybody into hip hop do not fight dogs.Most Black people are law abiding. We are not a lawless race of people as you're trying to suggest.Your comment is as ignorant a comment that I've ever heard. It's just as ignorant as dogfighting is, and you need to apologize. Don't just blame the culture, blame the White record labels that perpetuate this filth.

Posted by: keithponder21 | December 26, 2009 1:22 AM

Al Gibbs, it's racially bias for you or anyone to say the dogfighting is part of the Black culture in America,we just don't know any better.White people fight dogs too. It may be part of the hip hop culture, in which a lot of young Black people embrace, however a large number of ", BLACK PEOPLE, LIKE MYSELF", take no part in this kind of lifestyle. Everybody Black is not into hip hop, and everybody into hip hop do not fight dogs.Most Black people are law abiding. We are not a lawless race of people as you're trying to suggest.Your comment is as ignorant a comment that I've ever heard. It's just as ignorant as dogfighting is, and you need to apologize. Don't just blame the culture, blame the White record labels that perpetuate this filth.

Posted by: keithponder21 | December 26, 2009 1:24 AM

It’s rather hard for me to understand how his return to football could be characterized as a courageous act, even if the players voted him for the award. Yet at the same time, I thought Vick's incarceration was unfair and hypocritical. My problem with animal rights activism has always been that it sends out a mixed message. Why incarcerate people like Vick for dog fighting and then allow Sarah Palin, a former governor of Alaska, to kill innocent moose for sport? I guess many players felt sorry for him because they thought, like me, he was jailed unjustly, and not so much because they view him as a profile in courage.

Posted by: lwilliamson1 | December 26, 2009 10:08 AM

Ed Block, for whom this award was named, showed his courage on the battlefield, and sacrificed his health to defend his country and stand up for justice---not for an obscenely large paycheck and fame. When he was injured in battle, he did so in an effort to save the lives of others--not to shoot a long bomb into the end zone. Ed Block, unlike Vick, was HONORABLY discharged and had the courage to start over for real--in a new career--and help vulnerable children who (like Vick's dogs) couldn't fend for themselves, who depended on the caring compassion of others to triumph and to heal from their injuries (which Brock himself had not inflicted).

The award is also intended to honor those who demonstate good sportsmanship. Last time I checked, "good sports" played by the rules, treated others with respect, and helped them succeed, even if they didn't get the glory themselves. Good sports act with integrity, humility, and honesty--and they're the ones who DON'T get ejected from the game (or thrown into jail) in the first place.

Vick's teammates may want to help a friend who's been through a great deal of trouble, but there's got to be someone else on that team who deserves the award more.

Posted by: EdgewoodVA | December 26, 2009 1:36 PM

It has taken a lot of courage for him to come back in spite of the hatred and anger he has had to face. I applaud him for holding his head up and pressing on with his life.

However, I'm not sure if this award ... and what it apparently stands for ... was the right one.

But the players see a man who did not allow the error of his ways to destroy him ... or even define who he is. They are not blinded by the same wishy-washy, two-faced media as the public.

The next time you listen to a broadcaster in the booth during a game you will hear what I mean when I say "wishy-washy" and "two-faced." Let a player catch an interception. They are all over him saying how wonderful he is, talented, how he loves his community, etc., etc. But let him fumble that same ball and he's a scoundrel.

I applaud Andy Reid, Donovan McNabb and the Eagles organization for having the courage to pick up Vick when all the others were caving in out of fear of what their fans would say.

Posted by: gitouttahere | December 26, 2009 8:30 PM

What's so "courageous" about being outrageously overpaid to throw a ball around?

Jackie Robinson showed REAL courage when he broke the color barrier, keeping quiet in the face of numerous, racist threats.

Vick whines about how others couldn't cope with all the fiascoes he's inflicted on himself.

Again, exactly what "courage" does Vick possess that merits an honor named after someone who actually DID show courage and statesmanship, and, oh yeah, didn't torture and kill dogs for the sheer thrill of it?

Posted by: kingcranky | December 27, 2009 5:04 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.

 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company