The League

Archive: May 2010

Is the NFL doing enough to curb PED use?

Is the NFL doing enough to curb the use of banned substances through its drug testing and suspension policy?

By Reader Poll | May 28, 2010; 10:47 AM ET | Comments (0)

Level the playing field

The NFL could and should do more to enforce its banned substance policy, starting with making first-time offenders sit out a full season without pay.

By Leonard Shapiro | May 28, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Disorganized deterrent

With the NFL's current haphazard drug policy it appears the league will only take action against a player who test positive for a banned substance if it absolutely must. There's got to be a better way.

By Doug Farrar | May 28, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Time to reel in HGH

The NFL's drug testing system, for the most part, is effective in discouraging its players from using performance enhancing drugs, but it may be time for the league to regulate human growth hormone use as well.

By Dr. Mark Adickes | May 28, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (1)

Straightforward and sufficient

The NFL's performance enhancing drug policy is a sufficient enough deterrent and those who seek to beat the system are outliers, not the norm.

By Tim McHale | May 28, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

All about perspective

Like the tragic results that often result from legal drug use, the NFL's banned substance testing and suspension policy does enough to curb the use of performance enhancing drugs in the league.

By Dave Goldberg | May 28, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Super Meadowlands

New York is the perfect site to host the Super Bowl and the biggest week-long party in all of American professional sports.

By Edward Valentine | May 25, 2010; 12:01 AM ET | Comments (3)

Not your average Super Bowl

Playing a Super Bowl in New York could change the style of play on the field, but it won't make the dream of hosting the NFL's biggest game any closer to reality for the rest of the league's cold-weather teams.

By Brandon Benson | May 25, 2010; 12:01 AM ET | Comments (3)

Embrace the elements

Every city, regardless of climate, should have the opportunity to host the Super Bowl and experience the pinnacle of the NFL experience.

By Anthony Stalter | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Always warm on the couch

Cold weather Super Bowls would enhance the experience of the vast majority of NFL fans -- those who watch the game from the climate-controlled comforts of their own homes.

By Michael Kun | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Follow the money

The promise of a Super Bowl helps convince local municipalities to open up their wallets to help pay for new stadiums, regardless of climate.

By Jason Brewer | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

A flip of the coin

If the NFL begins to play Super Bowl games at outdoor stadiums in cold-weather climates, it will lead to the thought that championship games can be played anywhere and forever alter the league's grandest spectacle.

By Dave Goldberg | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Piling on layers

While hosting Super Bowls in cold climates may weed out some of the corporate presence at the NFL championship game and allow more average fans to attend, the product on the field could cost the league casual fans who prefer high-scoring affairs to defensive struggles.

By Adam Tracey | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Costs of the cold

Nostalgia aside, while playing multiple Super Bowls in cold weather cities would provide a boost to local economies, it would also test the financial abilities of those markets to host such a massive event.

By Josh Kirkendall | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Don't Expect It Beyond New York

If New Meadowlands Stadium hosts a Super Bowl, it will be a reward for the New York Giants and Jets spending so much money on a new stadium, but that won't necessarily lead to more cold weather championship games.

By Doug Farrar | May 25, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (4)

NFL players face unhealthy system when it comes to treating injuries

While NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell is considering whether to suspend players for seeking cures from the syringe-wielding physician Anthony Galea, he should ask why so many of them distrust their team physicians and seek alternative ways to heal. Medical care in the league is not a simple issue. Anyone who says otherwise should read up on O.J. McDuffie's case.

By Sally Jenkins | May 22, 2010; 10:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

Pay day for 'Dre

Andre Johnson is the best wide receiver in the NFL and it's time his contract reflected his value to the Houston Texans.

By Tim McHale | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

A blip on offseason radar

Both Andre and Chris Johnson deserve restructured contracts and both should get them before the season begins. Until then, their holdouts are just a blip on the offseason radar.

By Dave Goldberg | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Pony up and pay the man

Andre Johnson has made himself expendable by quietly becoming the best wide receiver in the NFL. Now the Houston Texans should defy conventional wisdom and pay their top talent.

By Anthony Stalter | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (3)

Long holdouts looming

Both Andre and Chris Johnson deserve new long-term contracts but neither has the leverage to make that happen anytime soon, which could result in lengthy holdouts and contract disputes.

By Joe Baker | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

CBA is biggest hurdle

The biggest hurdle preventing Chris Johnson from becoming the highest paid offensive player in the NFL isn't his team's wallet, it's the current Collective Bargaining Agreement.

By Jason Brewer | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Do Johnsons deserve new deals?

Should the Texans and Titans give Andre and Chris Johnson new deals?

By Reader Poll | May 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

AP mulligan fails

By its actions today, the AP has moved from simple carelessness to gross negligence.

By Emil Steiner | May 12, 2010; 3:11 PM ET | Comments (0)

Dear AP: Don't look back

Associated Press should stick with the votes they made at the end of the season, just as they do when voting for awards across professional sports.

By Brandon Benson | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Policy holes lead to undeserving winners

Holes in NFL banned substance testing policy allowed Brian Cushing and others to continue playing long after a positive test.

By Doug Farrar | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Suspension is sufficient

Brian Cushing's league-issued four-game suspension is punishment enough for his used of a banned substance. The Associated Press should not feel compelled to pile on by stripping him of his well-deserved Defensive Rookie of the Year award.

By Tim McHale | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

The pressure to perform

Brian Cushing is far from the first defensive rookie whose desire to be a star his first year led him to take performance enhancing drugs. Now he's suffering the consequences.

By Anthony Stalter | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (1)

It's in the position

The AP is right to revote on the 2009 Defensive Rookie of the Year award, but a trend of banned substance use among elite pass rushers might be a sign that certain position players are more likely to experiment with steroids.

By Joe Baker | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Should AP strip Cushing?

Should the Associated Press strip Houston Texans' linebacker Brian Cushing off his 2009 Defensive Rookie of the Year award for testing positive for a banned substance?

By Reader Poll | May 12, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Bears beef up

While they didn't make a big splash in the draft, the Chicago Bears were the most active team early in free agency and if their big-name acquisitions can step in and produce, they should be back in the playoff picture.

By Adam Tracey | May 6, 2010; 12:46 PM ET | Comments (0)

Ravens locked and loaded

Bolstered by several top free agent signings and another stellar draft class, the Baltimore Ravens have no excuse for not challenging for the AFC championship in 2010.

By Jason Brewer | May 5, 2010; 4:18 PM ET | Comments (0)

Ravens, Dolphins make big upgrades

The Baltimore Ravens and Miami Dolphins filled holes on both sides of the ball and provided young quarterbacks with significant upgrades in the passing game through the draft and free agency.

By Anthony Stalter | May 5, 2010; 11:34 AM ET | Comments (0)

Seahawks lead the pack

A great draft weekend and a pair of trades to help the running game have the Seahawks ready to compete again in the NFC West

By Doug Farrar | May 5, 2010; 7:14 AM ET | Comments (0)

Let's wait and see

The New York Jets and Washington Redskins both made a number of moves to improve their teams this offseason, but what impact those and any other moves will have won't be known until the regular season is fully underway.

By Dave Goldberg | May 5, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

NFC West beefs up

The Seattle Seahawks and San Francisco 49ers both took significant strides through free agent acquisitions and the draft make themselves division title contenders once again in the NFC West.

By David Fucillo | May 5, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (2)

Don't sleep on Bucs

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers may not be making offseason headlines, but with shrewd draft selections, they've assembled the foundation for a winning future.

By Nick Houllis | May 5, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Which team has had the best offseason?

Which NFL franchise has most improved its team during the 2010 offseason?

By Reader Poll | May 5, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

 
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May 2010 Archives