The League

Robert Littal
National Blogger

Robert Littal

CEO of Black Sports Online which brings the truth in sports.

Southern 'sizzurp' gaining in popularity

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With the arrest of JaMarcus Russell and suspension of Johnny Jolly, mainstream America is becoming aware of what is called "the purple drank". While it new for some, those in the hip-hop community have known about this for years.

For those not familiar, "Sippin on Sizzurp" was something that became popular in the southern regions of the country in the late 1990's.

Made popular by the late DJ Screw, and by legendary rap ground Three 6 Mafia, 'purple drank', aka 'sizzurp' is considered a recreational drug made by mixing medicated cough syrup containing codeine with soda and Jolly Rancher candy to enhance the taste.

Without a prescription, it is an illegal controlled substance, similar to marijuana. The difference being, no one has ever to my knowledge, overdosed from marijuana, whereas you can from sizzurp. Pimp C from the rap group UGK is just one example of someone who overdosed on too much sizzurp. DJ Screw, who made the drink famous, also died from sizzurp. It can be a very dangerous concoction if you become addicted.

With two NFL players being arrested for possession of the same drug within two years, it begs the question, how big of a problem this is in the world of athlete?

In my opinion, it is like weed to the athletes that use it. They feel it isn't a performance enhancer, so there is little harm in using the drug. It also doesn't have the negative connotation attached to cocaine or other harsher drugs.

I think it has been around for years, but it is more prevalent within the hip-hop community than the sports culture. Lil Wayne for example, is the most recent artist to rap about it.

In general athletes are looking for drugs that will bring them up, not take them down. Furthermore, it is more of a southern thing that has never caught on in other parts of the country. Russell and Jolly both grew up in the southern region where the drug is popular.

While it should be on the radar for professional sports leagues, I don't think it will be as big of a concern as steroids, but it definitely something more leagues should be aware of.

By Robert Littal  |  July 20, 2010; 12:23 PM ET  | Category:  NFL , NFL Rules , Substance Abuse Policy Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
Previous: Sippin' Siz-erp | Next: Abuse beyond NFL

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