The League

Archive: November 2010

Was $25,000 a fitting fine?

Was a $25,000 fine a fitting punishment for Andre Johnson and Cortland Finnegan's on-field brawl?

By Reader Poll | November 30, 2010; 10:58 AM ET | Comments (0)

Subjectivity is a necessity

The NFL must consider each situation -- including the track records of the players involved -- when deciding on appropriate punishments for fights, punches and illegal hits, to avoid heading down a slippery slope.

By Anthony Stalter | November 30, 2010; 10:33 AM ET | Comments (0)

Conspiracy theories

Perhaps Houston's next two games -- nationally televised matchups on Thursday and Monday nights -- played a role in the relatively light fine Andre Johnson and Cortland Finnegan received for their on-field fight.

By Tim McHale | November 30, 2010; 8:47 AM ET | Comments (1)

No fighting in Goodell's NFL

In Roger Goodell's NFL, displays of temper are not tolerated. And it's Cortland Finnegan whose reputation was further tarnished by his fight with Andre Johnson.

By Dave Goldberg | November 30, 2010; 12:40 AM ET | Comments (1)

Hits worse than fights

Long-term damage from helmet-to-helmet hits is more dangerous to the NFL than on-field fights and fines and suspensions should be levied accordingly.

By Michael Oriard | November 30, 2010; 12:25 AM ET | Comments (0)

A dangerous precedent

Failing to suspend players for fighting on the field sets a dangerous precedent in the NFL that could eventually result in injuries to star players.

By Michael Kun | November 30, 2010; 12:08 AM ET | Comments (0)

Fines do just fine

Fines and a coach's wrath have always been the best deterrents in the NFL, and the fines levied against Andre Johnson and Cortland Finnegan for their Sunday fracas should do just that.

By Leonard Shapiro | November 30, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (1)

Yesterday's news

Debating whether the Cowboys or Vikings have been the bigger disappointment this season is like debating which was a worse disaster: the Titanic or the Hindenburg.

By Michael Kun | November 24, 2010; 6:26 PM ET | Comments (0)

Futile foursome

Minnesota and Dallas have massively underachieved, but so have the revamped Cincinnati Bengals. Perhaps a "Futile Four" tournament would provide a fitting end to each of their seasons.

By Chris Richardson | November 23, 2010; 1:04 PM ET | Comments (1)

High hopes, blunted expectations

The situations in Dallas and Minnesota both demanded crisis control, which, in this case, resulted in the sacrifice of a head coach to make progress toward a better future.

By Derede McAlpin | November 23, 2010; 10:55 AM ET | Comments (1)

Vikings are biggest loser

The Vikings and Cowboys failed this year for strangely similar reasons, but Minnesota's fall from Super Bowl contender to NFL laughingstock has been the greater surprise

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | November 23, 2010; 10:42 AM ET | Comments (0)

Inevitable in Minnesota, not so in Big 'D'

The dismissal of Brad Childress in Minnesota was inevitable, but Wade Phillips' firing in Dallas could have been avoided had the Cowboys lived up to their potential.

By Brandon Benson | November 23, 2010; 10:07 AM ET | Comments (0)

Cowboys should have been better

The Cowboys' turnaround since Wade Phillips' firing shows their players quit on their former head coach - and that's downright shameful.

By Doug Farrar | November 23, 2010; 9:18 AM ET | Comments (0)

Deeply disappointing

Both the Minnesota Vikings and Dallas Cowboys have been colossal failures this season. The Vikings placed their bet on a 41-year-old quarterback while the Cowboys have failed to live up to their payroll.

By Dawn Knight | November 23, 2010; 1:13 AM ET | Comments (1)

Boys' bigger surprise

The writing was on the wall for the Vikings after everything went their way in 2009. With a roster loaded with talent, the Cowboys' demise is the bigger stunner.

By Anthony Stalter | November 23, 2010; 12:30 AM ET | Comments (0)

Great expectations

Brad Childress became the second head coach to fall victim to unfulfilled expectations on a team picked to challenge for a Super Bowl title.

By Leonard Shapiro | November 23, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (1)

Which team has been the bigger disappoint?

Which team has been the bigger disappointment this year?

By Reader Poll | November 22, 2010; 11:16 PM ET | Comments (0)

Storyline is MVP

Michael Vick might be a contender by the numbers, but when it comes to narrative he's the prohibitive favorite.

By Emil Steiner | November 18, 2010; 9:00 AM ET | Comments (0)

Who is NFL MVP right now?

Who is the NFL's MVP at this point in the season?

By Reader Poll | November 17, 2010; 8:40 AM ET | Comments (6)

A video game brought to life

Michael Vick is showcasing a freakish set of skills that only seemed possible when you designed your own player in Madden. If he keeps this up, he'll be much more than just a remarkable reclamation project.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | November 17, 2010; 8:23 AM ET | Comments (0)

A whole new Vick

If Michael Vick sustains his level of play and stays healthy, it could create a very interesting NFL MVP discussion at the end of the year.

By Michael Kun | November 17, 2010; 8:14 AM ET | Comments (0)

A knee-jerk reaction

Michael Vick deserves to be mentioned in the NFL MVP conversation, but there are plenty of others also having banner years who have proven their ability to stay healthy and contribute in every game their teams play.

By Matt Loede | November 17, 2010; 8:05 AM ET | Comments (1)

Health is paramount

If Michael Vick can stay healthy through the rest of the season and maintain his level of play to this point, there's no question that he'll be the NFL MVP. But that's a big "if."

By Leonard Shapiro | November 17, 2010; 7:54 AM ET | Comments (0)

For now, it's Vick

Michael Vick is bound to regress in the second half, but to this point, there's no question he's the NFL's most valuable player. And if he can stay healthy, he could very well earn the title by season's end.

By Anthony Stalter | November 17, 2010; 7:45 AM ET | Comments (1)

No rush to judgment

There's a reason the NFL moved its MVP voting to after the season -- to help ensure the most deserving player earns the award. Michael Vick is firmly in the conversation, but the award is still up in the air.

By Dave Goldberg | November 16, 2010; 3:12 PM ET | Comments (1)

Face it, Cowboys

Having fired their coach following a 1-7 start to the season, the Dallas Cowboys have officially become irrelevant.

By Dawn Knight | November 9, 2010; 4:03 PM ET | Comments (0)

Wade is out but problems remain

Firing Wade Phillips won't solve the problems facing the Dallas Cowboys, but getting a real general manager to replace Jerry Jones just might.

By Robert Littal | November 9, 2010; 2:24 PM ET | Comments (2)

Jerry Jones: Architect of mediocrity, enabler of failure

Jerry Jones' meddlesome ownership style has created a murky leadership ladder in Big D and has directly led to erratic play and unfulfilled potential on the field.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | November 9, 2010; 11:35 AM ET | Comments (0)

When in crisis, watch your blind side

After a 1-7 start, the reeling Dallas Cowboys face the daunting task of big business crisis management.

By Derede McAlpin | November 9, 2010; 11:27 AM ET | Comments (0)

Victims of the hype machine

The Cowboys are a victim of their own marketing and hype machine.

By Peter Schaffer | November 9, 2010; 11:11 AM ET | Comments (3)

Worst season ever

No matter their final record, the Cowboys are in the midst of the worst season in franchise history.

By Edward Valentine | November 9, 2010; 11:01 AM ET | Comments (1)

Succumbing to the hype

The Cowboys believed all the hype they heard coming into the season and forgot they had to win to make that predicted Super Bowl run a reality.

By Michael Kun | November 9, 2010; 10:29 AM ET | Comments (2)

Blame Jerry

The collapse of the Dallas Cowboys falls on the flash-over-substance personnel decisions made year after year by owner and general manager Jerry Jones.

By Dave Goldberg | November 9, 2010; 10:08 AM ET | Comments (0)

Parity reduces disparity

Star quarterbacks and shrewd front office decisions helped the AFC win six out of 10 Super Bowls, but this season's overall parity has reduced the AFC's dominance over the NFC.

By Dawn Knight | November 7, 2010; 5:36 PM ET | Comments (1)

It starts at the top

The stronghold the AFC has established in the NFL all boils down to the owner's box.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | November 4, 2010; 11:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

How great is the disparity between the AFC and NFC?

How great is the disparity between the AFC and NFC?

By Reader Poll | November 4, 2010; 11:32 AM ET | Comments (1)

It all comes down to execution

Despite popular belief, the difference between the quarterbacks, coaches and general managers in the AFC versus the NFC is not significant. In the end, it all comes down to execution on the field.

By Anthony Stalter | November 4, 2010; 11:10 AM ET | Comments (0)

QB play and youth

The AFC has been the stronger conference over the last several seasons due to two specific factors: elite quarterback play and a commitment to building with young draft talent.

By Brandon Benson | November 4, 2010; 10:54 AM ET | Comments (0)

Wait 'til the playoffs

Enough with all the in-season power rankings, show some patience and let things play out in the NFL playoffs. After all, that's why this sport has a playoff system -- to determine the best team in the league.

By Dave Goldberg | November 4, 2010; 10:41 AM ET | Comments (0)

Look to the front offices

The supposed superiority of the AFC in the 2010 season is based more than anything on the fact that many of the most talented NFC teams have allowed themselves to be run into the ground with terrible decision-making processes.

By Doug Farrar | November 4, 2010; 2:08 AM ET | Comments (0)

Moss as good as ... silver

Randy Moss has fallen from the top tier of wide receivers in the NFL, and while some team will benefit from him, he'll always give you at least as much trouble off the field as he does production on it.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | November 2, 2010; 11:30 AM ET | Comments (1)

Where will Moss end up?

Where will Randy Moss end up?

By Reader Poll | November 2, 2010; 9:19 AM ET | Comments (0)

A rolling stone gathers no Moss

Randy Moss demonstrated in Minnesota that his upside was not worth the investment of time or energy into his enigmatic presence on and off the field. Talent provides chances, but with Moss, commitment may be the trump card.

By Peter Schaffer | November 2, 2010; 8:59 AM ET | Comments (7)

The lights are coming on

Some team will take a chance on Randy Moss, but he just isn't what he used to be -- a bitter pill for the Minnesota Vikings to swallow.

By Jason Maloni | November 2, 2010; 8:48 AM ET | Comments (0)

One word: Wow

In just a month, Moss has gone from a potential savior for the Vikings to unemployed wide receiver. How this has happened is absolutely mind-boggling.

By Michael Kun | November 2, 2010; 1:00 AM ET | Comments (3)

A Moss-y mess

Randy Moss wants to play for a winner, but only if he gets paid top dollar. For the malcontent receiver, that combination will continue to be hard to find.

By Anthony Stalter | November 2, 2010; 12:45 AM ET | Comments (0)

A destructive force

As good as he has been at times in his career, Randy Moss continues to be the epitome of a locker room cancer -- a tag that may have teams thinking twice about claiming him off waivers.

By Leonard Shapiro | November 2, 2010; 12:30 AM ET | Comments (0)

Want Randy? He's yours

Dan Snyder and the Washington Redskins could be the perfect landing spot for waived wide receiver Randy Moss.

By Dave Goldberg | November 2, 2010; 12:10 AM ET | Comments (2)

 
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November 2010 Archives