The League

Archive: December 2010

Pick the Pack

Aaron Rodgers and that Dom Capers defense will make the Packers the toughest out in the NFC.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | December 29, 2010; 1:57 PM ET | Comments (0)

Saints flying under the radar

Last year, everyone saw the Saints coming. This year, people are only tracking them out of the corner of their eye. And that, perhaps, is what makes them most dangerous.

By Anthony Stalter | December 29, 2010; 11:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

Don't doubt the champs

The defending Super Bowl champion Saints proved Monday in Atlanta that they are ready to defend their title - and the rest of the NFC should take notice.

By Leonard Shapiro | December 29, 2010; 10:51 AM ET | Comments (0)

Saints, Packers are the toughest seeds

The Saints are peaking just in time for the playoffs while Aaron Rodgers and the Packers will be a handful for any team they face in the playoffs (assuming they make it).

By Doug Farrar | December 29, 2010; 10:34 AM ET | Comments (0)

Falcons a formidable favorite

With a balanced offense, a healthy lineup and presumably home field advantage, the Falcons are the most dangerous team in the NFC.

By Brandon Benson | December 29, 2010; 10:29 AM ET | Comments (0)

Most dangerous team in NFC?

Who is the most dangerous NFC team heading into the playoffs?

By Reader Poll | December 28, 2010; 3:10 PM ET | Comments (1)

Eagles, Saints lead pack

The Eagles have proven no lead is safe against them while the Saints showed Monday night they are capable of beating anyone anywhere. Both teams have a great shot to make a Super Bowl run.

By Jason Brewer | December 28, 2010; 2:48 PM ET | Comments (0)

Sticking with the Falcons

The Falcons are nearly unstoppable at home, and with the road to the Super Bowl likely running through Atlanta, they will be tough to beat - even more so following Monday's home loss to the Saints.

By Michael Kun | December 28, 2010; 2:35 PM ET | Comments (4)

Speed kills for Eagles

With speed to spare and Michael Vick playing his best football ever, the Eagles pose numerous problems for any team matching up against them in the NFC playoffs.

By Dave Goldberg | December 28, 2010; 1:52 PM ET | Comments (1)

When will they ever learn?

The NFL still does not know how long a player should sit out after a concussion and the league should continue to research concussions and prevent players from returning to the field too soon.

By Leonard Shapiro | December 22, 2010; 10:02 AM ET | Comments (0)

Using the evidence

New research on the effects of multiple concussions could help force the NFL to mandate longer rest periods to protect their players from absorbing more punishment.

By Dr. Matthew Prowler | December 21, 2010; 7:01 PM ET | Comments (1)

Three strikes and you're out

NFL players who suffer three concussions in one season should without a doubt be shut down for the rest of the year to prevent further injury.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | December 21, 2010; 2:34 PM ET | Comments (0)

Terrible uncertainties

Our best hope is for advances in the research on head trauma that will clarify football's risks -- but in the interim, fans must continue to push concussion awareness and treatment to the forefront of the NFL's consciousness.

By Michael Oriard | December 21, 2010; 12:09 PM ET | Comments (0)

Who's responsible?

Only when every player on the field realizes that concussions are injuries and plays the game that way will we finally see a reduction in these injuries.

By Dr. Mark Adickes | December 21, 2010; 11:29 AM ET | Comments (0)

Can't rush recovery

Bringing players back to NFL action following a concussion must be a careful, deliberate and tempered process. Rushing a player like Austin Collie back too soon could result in permanent brain damage and an early ending to a career.

By Dawn Knight | December 21, 2010; 11:16 AM ET | Comments (0)

It's the helmets!

The technology that has created more protective helmets for NFL players has simultaneously created more powerful, dangerous weapons to damage the heads and health of other players.

By Michael Kun | December 21, 2010; 11:01 AM ET | Comments (0)

The Patriots empire strikes back

In a strange 2010 season, the New England Patriots' return to the top is a rare slice of normalcy.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | December 15, 2010; 1:26 PM ET | Comments (0)

...But there's a "nasty" in "dynasty"

Bill Belichick is the key ingredient to the Patriots' success over the past decade and it's his unwillingness to budge from his coaching and managerial blueprint that has New England atop the NFL once again this year.

By Jason Maloni | December 15, 2010; 1:03 PM ET | Comments (0)

Credit the O-line, running game

While Tom Brady deserves much of the credit, New England's offensive line and running game have helped the 2010 Patriots' offense reach new heights.

By Brandon Benson | December 15, 2010; 10:50 AM ET | Comments (0)

Doing the right thing

With his youngest team yet, Bill Belichick has the Patriots playing the best football in the NFL and when it's all said and done, this year's team could rival the 2007 team that went 18-1.

By Leonard Shapiro | December 14, 2010; 4:40 PM ET | Comments (14)

Patriots are peerless

Bill Belichick and the New England Patriots are in a class of their own atop the NFL.

By Michael Kun | December 14, 2010; 2:20 PM ET | Comments (2)

Belichick the mastermind

Bill Belichick remains a step ahead of the rest of the NFL and the 2010 Patriots are proof. The star power is nowhere to be found but the wins keep piling up.

By Anthony Stalter | December 14, 2010; 1:28 PM ET | Comments (6)

George Young's lesson

Bill Belichick learned under former New York Giants general manager George Young that teams win championships as often as stars do.

By Dave Goldberg | December 14, 2010; 12:22 PM ET | Comments (1)

Countless misteps led to early exit

Twenty-three months is not enough time to evaluate a head coach, unless he only makes disastrous decisions in that span.

By Anthony Stalter | December 7, 2010; 12:24 PM ET | Comments (1)

Experience trumps genius

Josh McDaniels was hired because he had been tagged a young "genius" working under Bill Belichik. His failures prove once again that experience is paramount in the NFL's coaching ranks.

By Dave Goldberg | December 7, 2010; 11:57 AM ET | Comments (0)

Winning matters

Josh McDaniels made repeated poor personnel decisions, was responsible for a second 'Spygate' and alienated one of the best fanbases in the league. But in the end, it was his inability to win games that sent him packing.

By Leonard Shapiro | December 7, 2010; 11:03 AM ET | Comments (0)

Too many bad decisions

Josh McDaniels repeatedly made bad decisions as head coach of the Denver Broncos. By firing him, the Broncos made a good one.

By Michael Kun | December 7, 2010; 10:40 AM ET | Comments (0)

 
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December 2010 Archives