The League

Anthony Stalter
National Blogger

Anthony Stalter

Senior Sports Editor for The Scores Report

Rex's hype machine

CLICK TO REACT Facebook

You're being duped.

Everyone thinks the Jets are classless or just craving attention. But the trash talking that Rex Ryan and his players do comes down to one thing: Hype.

This "us vs. the world" mentality has become the Jets' identity under Ryan. We read his comments and we think he's taking pot shots at Tom Brady but what he's really doing is getting himself and his team psyched up.

If he stirs things up with Brady, Ryan knows that he'll catch his player's attention and get them completely focused. If Brady winds up playing with raw emotion instead of using his head, then all the better. But this is a tactic used by Ryan to get his team prepared and that's it.

John Henderson used to have one of the Jaguars' team employees smack him as hard as they could across his face before games. Other players grab each other's facemaks and head butt like two rams doing battle in an open field. Many others listen to loud music, scream, chant or pray.

These are all motivational tactics and most of them are widely accepted. We as fans have come to understand and accept these rituals because we want our team to be as pumped up as possible.

But we want the Jets to just shut up and play.

Think about it though, the Jets do all this trash talking and then as soon as their opposition strikes back, they make it out to be like they're the ones being disrespected. Do you know how insane that is? Nobody in his or her right mind would call the opposing quarterback an a-hole and then get offended when one of the a-hole's receivers takes a few pot shots at their head coach. But the Jets do.

It's a mental thing - that's all it is. Ryan gets them all hopped up during the week thinking that they're the ones being disrespected that by opening kickoff, his players are ready to tear their opponent to pieces. Did you see Bart Scott's interview with Sal Paolantonio after the Jets beat the Patriots? He looked like a caged animal roaming back and forth ready to pounce on its next victim. He made it out to be that everyone was against the Jets, yet it was because of the Jets that everyone was against them.

Again, nobody is this crazy - this is just what they do.

Are the Jets good for the NFL? Absolutely. Do you know how many people tuned into that game last Sunday? Forty-three million. That's a new Divisional viewing record and not all of those people tuned in just because it was the Patriots. They either watched because they wanted to see New England shut the Jets up or to watch Ryan and company back up their talk. They got the latter, which was definitely the more entertaining of the two options. (Unless you were a Patriots fan.)

The NFL doesn't want all of this trash talking to turn into the "Don King Hour" but the league could stand to spice things up a little. I love my football as pure as anyone, but the NFL gaining a bigger audience isn't a bad thing. You may not like the Jets' bravado, but tell me you don't love rooting against them. Tell me you won't tune into this weekend's AFC Championship Game just to see if the Steelers can finally put some duct tape over Ryan's mouth. Tell me how this is any different from the old Oakland Raiders teams that used to rile everybody up with their brash antics? You may have hated them too but you would tune in hoping to see them fail.

In the end, don't be fooled though. The Jets know what they're doing. They want you to hate them. It's their way of getting you to smack them as hard as possible across the face so that when they walk onto Heinz Field on Sunday, it's them versus the world.

By Anthony Stalter  |  January 18, 2011; 12:32 PM ET  | Category:  AFC , New England Patriots , New York Jets , Playoffs Save & Share:  Send E-mail   Facebook   Twitter   Digg   Yahoo Buzz   Del.icio.us   StumbleUpon   Technorati  
Previous: Please shut up | Next: Talk big, win bigger

Post a Comment




characters remaining

 
RSS Feed
Subscribe to The Post

© 2011 The Washington Post Company