The League

Archive: Concussions

When will they ever learn?

The NFL still does not know how long a player should sit out after a concussion and the league should continue to research concussions and prevent players from returning to the field too soon.

By Leonard Shapiro | December 22, 2010; 10:02 AM ET | Comments (0)

Using the evidence

New research on the effects of multiple concussions could help force the NFL to mandate longer rest periods to protect their players from absorbing more punishment.

By Dr. Matthew Prowler | December 21, 2010; 07:01 PM ET | Comments (1)

Three strikes and you're out

NFL players who suffer three concussions in one season should without a doubt be shut down for the rest of the year to prevent further injury.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | December 21, 2010; 02:34 PM ET | Comments (0)

Terrible uncertainties

Our best hope is for advances in the research on head trauma that will clarify football's risks -- but in the interim, fans must continue to push concussion awareness and treatment to the forefront of the NFL's consciousness.

By Michael Oriard | December 21, 2010; 12:09 PM ET | Comments (0)

Who's responsible?

Only when every player on the field realizes that concussions are injuries and plays the game that way will we finally see a reduction in these injuries.

By Dr. Mark Adickes | December 21, 2010; 11:29 AM ET | Comments (0)

Can't rush recovery

Bringing players back to NFL action following a concussion must be a careful, deliberate and tempered process. Rushing a player like Austin Collie back too soon could result in permanent brain damage and an early ending to a career.

By Dawn Knight | December 21, 2010; 11:16 AM ET | Comments (0)

It's the helmets!

The technology that has created more protective helmets for NFL players has simultaneously created more powerful, dangerous weapons to damage the heads and health of other players.

By Michael Kun | December 21, 2010; 11:01 AM ET | Comments (0)

Undetectable damage

For every concussion diagnosed, further undetected brain damage is likely done. The NFL must enforce suspensions to discourage head hunting and the use of helmets as weapons by defensive players.

By Richard Boadu & Claude Clayborne | October 19, 2010; 10:44 AM ET | Comments (0)

Use your head?

The NFL must set its policy on helmet-to-helmet hits with consideration to all lower levels of football where players are taught to emulate the physical play of professional stars.

By Dr. Mark Adickes | October 19, 2010; 08:52 AM ET | Comments (0)

Changing a defender's mindset

Rodney and James Harrison made it clear that some defenders are looking to hurt players with every hit. The only way to change that mentality is to actually enforce ejections and suspensions.

By Joe Baker | October 19, 2010; 08:40 AM ET | Comments (0)

What should the NFL do to reduce helmet-to-helmet hits?

What should the NFL do to limit the helmet-to-helmet hits that so often cause concussions and other serious injuries?

By Reader Poll | October 19, 2010; 01:00 AM ET | Comments (4)

Waiting on technology to catch up

Players are instructed and encouraged to make big hits, and a fine likely won't discourage them from doing so.

By Anthony Stalter | October 19, 2010; 12:56 AM ET | Comments (2)

More to be done

The NFL is paying greater attention to the serious health risks of concussions, but a simple rule change without more medical restrictions on a player's ability to return to the field following a concussion won't cut it.

By Dr. Matthew Prowler | October 19, 2010; 12:30 AM ET | Comments (1)

Head to head combat

The NFL is taking head injuries seriously and game suspensions should help limit helmet-to-helmet hits, but re-teaching tackling techniques to better protect players may be worth exploring as well.

By Dawn Knight | October 19, 2010; 12:15 AM ET | Comments (1)

A violent, dangerous game

Football is a violent and dangerous game, and at some point there's not much else the NFL can do to prevent head injuries.

By Jason Brewer | October 19, 2010; 12:10 AM ET | Comments (1)

Teaching "toughness"

Football players are taught from a young age that the game is about punishing and intimidating your opponent. Until that fundamental teaching changes, no amount of punishment will reverse the trend of dangerous hits to the head.

By Dave Goldberg | October 19, 2010; 12:00 AM ET | Comments (2)

Take it slow, Brian

Let's hope for his sake, his future doesn't pay for his present.

By Anthony Stalter | December 16, 2009; 01:42 PM ET | Comments (0)

He will play

If every test shows he's putting himself at no greater risk, he ought to be allowed to write his own ending.

By Sean McCann | December 16, 2009; 01:04 PM ET | Comments (0)

Know when to walk away, know when to run

I think the wise professional and medical recommendation would be for Brian Westbrook to call it quits this season.

By Dr. A. Brion Gardner | December 16, 2009; 10:56 AM ET | Comments (0)

Protect for the Future

Without great hits, the NFL game would just be mediocre at best, so we need to equip players with better armor.

By Mackie Shilstone | October 29, 2009; 12:11 AM ET | Comments (0)

Players' Choice

If the NFL were to continue to soften the rules I can guarantee you they will lose a part of their audience.

By Robert Littal | October 28, 2009; 03:30 PM ET | Comments (3)

My Fault

Take a survey of how sports is marketed and you will find violence.

By Brian Tarcy | October 28, 2009; 10:13 AM ET | Comments (0)

Don't Need Concussions

Rule modifications and equipment modifications won't make football worse -- the heightened interest in head injuries will lead to a better product on the field.

By Dr. A. Brion Gardner | October 28, 2009; 09:38 AM ET | Comments (1)

Let the Hearings Begin

Is the future of the NFL at stake in these hearings? Absolutely. Violence is not incidental but fundamental to the appeal of the game.

By Michael Oriard | October 28, 2009; 07:46 AM ET | Comments (5)

Fans Must Fight Back

Stand up loudly against the mistreatment of old NFL heroes. Only until you protest, will changes be made.

By Brent Boyd | October 28, 2009; 06:55 AM ET | Comments (2)

Football Hurts

The only way to end concussions in the NFL is to shut down the league.

By Dave Goldberg | October 28, 2009; 06:21 AM ET | Comments (8)

Modern Gladiators

It's hard to imagine a Hank Williams Jr's: "Are you ready for some Flag Football? "

By Dr. Matthew Prowler | October 28, 2009; 06:10 AM ET | Comments (5)

Call me an NFL Rubbernecker

So we watch for big hits? Players know what they are getting themselves into when they strap on a helmet.

By Dan Levy | October 28, 2009; 06:07 AM ET | Comments (8)

Leadership Needed From 280 Park Ave

Only by showing leadership can the NFL win this one. In sports, as in business, sometimes that's a tall order.

By Jason Maloni | October 28, 2009; 06:04 AM ET | Comments (0)

Death Not an Inherent Risk

Despite Carson Palmer's comments, I disagree 100 percent with the notion that death is an inherent risk in football.

By Roman Oben | September 9, 2009; 02:31 PM ET | Comments (2)

A Death Would Change Football

If a death were to occur it could result in a dramatic shift in NFL policy.

By Jason Maloni | September 9, 2009; 11:51 AM ET | Comments (3)

Isn't That Why We Watch?

We root for men from our city to beat men from your city into submission.

By Dan Levy | September 9, 2009; 11:19 AM ET | Comments (2)

Death Won't Kill NFL

In fact, if a player were to die on the field it might improve ratings

By Chris Richardson | September 9, 2009; 10:18 AM ET | Comments (0)

Expect a Football Fatality

I believe Palmer is right. One day the NFL will experience a death on the field

By Josh Kirkendall | September 9, 2009; 10:00 AM ET | Comments (2)

Dying From Football

What kills and maims in football is just the underside of what makes NFL football the country's favorite spectator sport.

By Michael Oriard | September 9, 2009; 08:12 AM ET | Comments (0)

The Quick and the Dead

With the speed of today's players, it is not out of the realm of possibility that a death could happen in a game.

By Joe Reedy | September 9, 2009; 08:03 AM ET | Comments (0)

Football Kills, Deal With It

If they don't want to put their lives in danger, they can choose a different line of work.

By Larry Brown | September 9, 2009; 08:02 AM ET | Comments (0)

New Rules to Stop Death

It's necessary to adjust the rules to compensate for the "athletic freaks" we see out on the field now.

By David Fucillo | September 9, 2009; 07:59 AM ET | Comments (0)

Double Your Durability

The feature back may not be completely dead but the two back system is more popular because of the beating that running backs take in the NFL.

By Jimmy Morris | August 17, 2009; 11:16 AM ET | Comments (0)

Depressing Conclusions

While it is accepted that cognitive and mood changes can result from head trauma, there is still great uncertainty within the medical field about how to define brain injury and even greater about how to treat it.

By Dr. Matthew Prowler | June 10, 2009; 12:49 PM ET | Comments (0)

The NFL Ignored Us

Just as the tobacco companies fought like hell to deny links to cancer; the NFL is desperately, and corruptly, trying to deny liability for the carnage left behind by decades of head injuries.

By Brent Boyd | June 10, 2009; 10:06 AM ET | Comments (2)

We Didn't Know Any Better

In the 70's and 80's coaches didn't know any better -- players would get knocked out in the first quarter and be playing in the second.

By Dick Vermeil | June 10, 2009; 10:03 AM ET | Comments (1)

Study Film, Damage Brain?

The league makes concussed players leave the field, but could studying tape the next day be just as dangerous?

By Mackie Shilstone | June 10, 2009; 09:47 AM ET | Comments (0)

Never Safe Enough

The NFL is doing what they need to do, but need to keep doing it, even after players retire.

By Keenan McCardell | June 10, 2009; 09:30 AM ET | Comments (0)

Teams Keep Quiet When Players Have Their Bell Rung

The NFL has done a dismal job of identifying and treating one of the major post concussive symptoms, depression.

By Dr. A. Brion Gardner | June 10, 2009; 09:06 AM ET | Comments (0)

More Needs to Be Done

It is time for the football, from Pop Warner to the NFL, to make significant and drastic advances in the handling of concussions.

By Peter Schaffer | June 10, 2009; 08:33 AM ET | Comments (1)

Very Little Has Changed

Concussions need to be handled by an independent physician in as objective a manner as possible rather than a conflicted team staff.

By Doug Farrar | June 10, 2009; 08:12 AM ET | Comments (0)

Teach Your Children Well

A parent coaching football is no different than a parent coaching swimming.

By Dan Levy | June 10, 2009; 07:40 AM ET | Comments (0)

 
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